Sex and Nudity in Today’s Visual Culture

“Women have been paid, down the ages, for taking their clothes off in public” (Thorp, 2016) and this tradition has settled so deeply down in the collective unconscious of most part of the world that sex and nudity (extraneous or essential) have become an unquestioned tradition at least in the cinema.

Sex and nudity make for hot sales, making entertainment smooth, oiling the cogs of the commercial machine. The result, far-fetched as it may seem at first, is that sex/nudity is the symbol of power. Why do you think so many girls and women take off their clothes on stage on their own or are dressed so scantily that dress on their body are reduced to irrelevance or a fly perched irritatingly on a wrong spot and demonstrate their gifts of nature? They are not just freeing their nipples; they are doing business and politics—they show the rest of the dressed girls and women in the world are either COWARDS or INFERIORS (OR BOTH) because they have nothing interesting or worthy of show. The dressed girls thus cleared off the world stage, these undressed girls and women prove they are the most desirable women in the world—sexiest women. They make money, they are strong, and more than that, they are feared and envied by all women in the world and fetishized by men. Business and politics.

This is where Bansky’s view becomes fucking relevant. Please refer to the picture.

That said, I love sex, I love nudity, when they themselves, not with ulterior motives. I would not care if it were something interesting or something strange fallen from Mars if some women (beautiful or ugly, sexy or not) walked with nothing on around where my passing eyes could see. I also want to walk around naked–I love being naked. Most of the time I am naked in my room. It is just comfortable. And not just that, I don’t want bodies–male or female–to be problems inherently. But when there are just so few of us thinking like this, when the rest of the whole world is made of sex addicts and those who find body offensive, I would save myself. Jesus Sexy Christ, I don’t want to get crucified without resurrection.

Honestly, I love sex, and done well, I think, it is an art in itself and spiritual, too. I love nudity—nature is nude: dogs, cats, horses, trees, grass, rocks … I take nude photographs—male and female nudes, and of myself. (Recently one nude photograph leaked and surfaced somewhere, and a girl called me “BASTARD.” I did not respond. Now the issue has been contained.) These photographs (except those of myself–they were for fun) were taken for essential use, not as part of wanton salacious indulgence or to serve voyeuristic purposes. Nudity for me is purity. Stripped of everything extraneous, the body is once again with its purse self in nudity. Fashions change, values change, but the body remains true to itself, unchanged. The change in an evolutionary time scale is as good as unchancing purity to the photographic body. Sex and nudity will form the sine qua non of my films.

However, sex and nudity is offensive, irritating, disgusting (to say the least) when they are employed extraneously, immaturely, and self-consciously. Most of the sex and nudity in the films now are unnecessary and obnoxious, and nude pictures on the Internet masquerading as art churned out every single second by photographer all over the world are shamelessly self-touching and betrayingly pretentious. (Yes, I agree that there may be no universal measure to determine “it’s necessary, and that’s not” and maybe I think what others think necessary is unnecessary. I may mistaken but I think too many instances of sex and nudity nowadays just come out like that, not from the concerns of necessity.) I have stopped subscribing to many photography sites. I don’t know how the makers of such movies and such photographs distinguish these parts of their work from pornography. I have no problem with pornography, but differently I love pornography and honor these people for their honesty—they do not pretend to be something else than they really are. Pornography is not an art form, and if anybody does pornography, they should have the guts to say they do pornography, not art.

On another side, interestingly, sex and nudity have, irrespective of their relevance, become so normal even when the actresses are unwilling to do it (but they have to do it lest they would lose their career) that “now it seems some of them are being asked to pay, and handsomely too, for the privilege of not taking them [clothes] off” (Thorp, 2016).

Works Cited

Thorp, V. (2016, November 27). Cinema trains lens on role of nude scene: artistic, erotic or gratuitous. The Guardian.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s